Archive for the ‘social issues’ Category

If there is one invention that has been equally good and bad for society it has got to be television.

“All television is educational television. The question is: what is it teaching?” – Nicholas Johnson

Commercial television broadcasting began in earnest in 1946 and it’s success has been nothing short of phenomenal. The only problem with watching TV is that it can do us as much harm as it can do us good.

What’s good about TV?

There are many good things about TV;

# It keeps us informed and brings the world community closer together.

# It’s combination of words and images makes it a valuable and effective learning tool.

# TV helps to promote understanding and acceptance of each other’s cultures and it has done a great deal for our freedom of speech.

# It is the King of family entertainment.

# Knowledge really is power and TV has undoubtedly been a major source of learning for humankind over the last seventy years.

What’s bad about TV?

“Television has changed a child from an irresistible force to an immovable object.” – Author Unknown

“Today, watching television often means fighting, violence and foul language – and that’s just deciding who gets to hold the remote control.” – Donna Gephart

Again, the list of what is bad about TV is also virtually endless, it really is amazing that something can have so many positives and yet so many negatives.

# TV has promoted laziness in ourselves and our children. We now take less exercise because it is a much easier option to simply switch on the TV and veg out on the sofa.

# The power and influence of TV can be exerted negatively as well as positively. we are constantly subjected to unscrupulous advertising and in extreme cases malicious propaganda.

# It is human nature to mimick other people, therefor we are prone to copying things that we see on TV. Because of our obsession with bad news and shocking behaviour the programme makers are increasingly exposing us to more and more of it and this is having a self depricating effect on our own behaviour and lifestyles.

A frightening spin off of this supply and demand mechanism is that the programme content has got to become increasingly shocking in order to retain the same impact and thus we are being exposed to and subsequently copying worse and worse situations and behavioural traits.

# Finally, family interaction has certainly suffered at the hands of TV. Board games and book reading are increasingly becoming things of the past.

Is there a compromise?

Communication will always play a key part in our society and anything that enhances communication will always become popular.

With this thought in mind it would be foolish of anyone to try to prohibit these improved medias. It is wiser to embrace and understand them if only to develop the ability to monitor and regulate them.

Many people throughought history have been credited with promoting an attitude of ‘moderation in all things’ and it is great attitude to embrace.

If we limit the amount of time we spend watching TV to a reasonable level it will do us more good than harm.

“Never go to excess, but let moderation be your guide.” –  Marcus Tullius Cicero

“They say that ninety percent of TV is junk.  But, ninety percent of everything is junk.” – Gene Roddenberry

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

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“I feel sorry for people who don’t drink. When they wake up in the morning, that’s as good as they’re going to feel all day.” – Frank Sinatra

Most people like the odd alcoholic drink and most of us are guilty of occasionally having one too many. Yeah, at the time we feel great, the party’s in full flow and so are we. It’s just a pity it all has to end but unfortunately it always does.

The next morning, the first thing that hits us is our banging headache, we open our eyes and eventually the room swims into focus. We experience flashbacks of the night before and if the memories are good ones we smile or even laugh at them but this only makes our headache worse so we turn over and try to get some more sleep.

Our bodies natural reaction is a good one and if we have the time we should go with it and try to sleep off the hangover. Alternatively here are the best hangover remedies:

1. Do not make it worse:

Hangovers make us dehydrated but we must avoid caffeine and orange juice at all costs. Caffeine will serve only to make us more dehydrated and the acid in orange juice will play havoc with our digestive systems. It’s also unwise to eat a fry up for similar reasons.

“It takes only one drink to get me drunk. The trouble is, I can’t remember if it’s the thirteenth or the fourteenth.” – George Burns

2. Water:

Water is the main antidote for a hangover. Alternating alcoholic drinks with glasses of water is not always fun but drinking a pint of water before we go to bed is a good remedy. If it makes us need the loo in the middle of the night we should use the opportunity to have another drink of water, our bodies will be extremely grateful for it come morning time.

Drinking water the morning after the night before is also beneficial but has nothing like the effect of the bedtime drink.

3. Food:

Eating plenty of food with our alcohol definitely has a positive effect but we must avoid eating late on because our systems will have to use up a lot of excess energy digesting it whilst we sleep.

Best foods to combat a hangover are eggs wich help mop up left over toxins and bananas/Kiwi fruit which replace potassium lost to alcohol’s diuretic effect. Also all non acidic fruit juices are good hangover remedies.

4. Freshening up:

It can seem like a real hassle but showering and general grooming will always make us feel better, the worst thing we can do with a hangover is mope around the house in our dressing gowns all day

5. Fresh air:

Get out of the house, and take a little light exercise, the endorphins produced by the exercise will automatically make us feel better and the fresh air will help to clear our heads.

6. Herbal remedies:

Most are a load of rubbish but one that does ‘exactly what it says on the tin’ is ‘Milk thistle liquid extract’ If you take the recommended dosage mixed with WATER just before retiring you will feel one hundred per cent better in the morning.

“I spent most of my money on alcohol, women and fast cars, the rest I just squandered.” – George Best

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

“Doctors are men who prescribe medicines of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of whom they know nothing” – Voltaire (1694 – 1778)

In this day and age the vast majority of people are fortunate enough to enjoy relatively decent health but there comes a time in everyone’s life when they require medical advice and/or treatment. 

Wether to visit the doctor or not is always a tough decision though, the main consideration being, do you feel ill enough to undergo the ordeal?

On the occasions that you do decide to ask for medical guidance, invariably, by the time you have gone through with the whole painful process you wish you hadn’t’ve bothered.

Unmistakeably there are a lot of good doctors out there, afterall the qualification process is lenghy and arduous, (or so the layman is led to believe) but there are a lot of quacks as well.

Before you actually get to see the doctor though you must first make an appointment. That should be easy you may think? – Wrong.

Unless you can prove you are actually close to death, the earliest a doctor will see you is three weeks next Friday.

After much pleeding with the most unpleasant receptionists you could ever have the displeasure of speaking to (everyday’s a bad day for these people) and if you are able to fill the most anti-social part of their schedule, (IE within the next five minutes or five to midnight) you may just manage to get an appointment that same day.

However, before you experience the joy of speaking to the receptionists you must first get through to one of them. This process usually consists of getting aprox 27 engaged dialing tones before finally getting a successful one. (punch the air in celebration – back of the net! – get in there my son. etc)

Of course, this goes unanswered for 5 minutes before eventually ringing off. You frantically press re-dial only to be met with the engaged signal once again… Patience is a virtue.

If patience IS one of your virtues and you have a couple of hours to kill, you will eventually get through. (promise)

“God heals, and the Doctor takes the Fees” Benjamin Franklin  (1706-1790)

When you arrive at the surgery the afoementioned receptionists treat anyone who is not a waiting room veteran with disdain and contempt, as for people who work for a living, they are just looked upon as an inconvenience to the system.

The waiting room experience is another joyous event. Everyone sat there in silence. First you flick through a five-year-old magazine (£1 a day for a few newspapers is beyond the budget – afterall we do only pay 98.4% of our salaries in Income Tax and NI) before reading all the medical literature that’s pasted up on the walls. You then start scrutinizing the room in far greater detail, the colour of the carpet, the type of furniture…

“De dum, de dum, de dum.”

Next you try and guess what everyone else has come for, who looks genuine, who doesn’t, time slows down, and then S-T-O-P-S altogether. Your watch is not broken, it’s just an illusion.

By the time your name is finally called you are aproaching a state of catatonia.

You never see the same doctor twice, unless as previously mentioned you are willing to wait up to three weeks for the pleasure, so most of the actual appointment time is taken up with the doctor familiarising themselves with your notes.

The medical advice you actually receive can be anything from common sense to absolute baloney. Some of the newer doctors have a tendency to read from medical books or consult the internet whilst they’re speaking to you. On occasions doctors will ask YOUR advice on what YOU think the diagnosis is! – Scary.

Invariably you are told to take ‘Paracetamol’ or ‘Panadol’ for a fortnight and return if the symptoms persist, well they do only get paid £150,000 per annum so I suppose it’s unfair to expect too much of them.

In fairness though the system works well because every time you undergo the ordeal of visiting the doctor, it puts you off the idea again for at least another five years, unless that is you become seriously ill and if that happens, God help you.

“My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn’t pay the bill he gave me six months more.” – Walter Matthau

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

The Importance of Education

“Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.” – H. G. Wells (1866 – 1946)

I first came across the above quotation about ten years ago when I read a book on prophets, the quote has stuck with me over the years but I must admit I had always thought it was Jules verne that said it. (Doh!)

Science fiction writers are by their very nature good predictors of the future and H. G. Wells’ words have always resonated with me. Potentially, the next twenty years or so are going to be the most critical years we will ever face.

So much is happening so fast these days that it is vital that we have the werewithall to keep up with it. Therefor the role of education is taking on a greater and greater significance.

A hundred years ago it was only the priviliged few who were fortunate enough to receive an education and reading and writing were considered great skills. Fortunately, we’ve reached a point in our evolution where illiteracy has for the most part been eradicated.

“Only the educated are free.” – Epictetus (55 – 135 AD)

There are five ways that we absorb information, in order of popularity they are; Verbal, Visual, Tactile, Kinesthetic (info manipulation) and Aural.

Personally, I think people learn better if they enjoy what they are doing. Ocassionally, people contact me and ask me things like “why are you always fooling around?” or “Why don’t you take personal development seriously?”

I always give the same answer: I DO take PD seriously, I get up at 4:30 am every morning to write my website’s daily update, now that’s taking things seriously! As for the fooling around part, well old habits die hard…

“What we learn with pleasure we never forget.”  – Alfred Mercier (1816 – 1894)

As parents we cannot force our children to study, we can only advise them that it’s in their best interests to do so. As a child I received zero pressure, only encouragement from my parents and their approach paid off.

Psychology is one of my passions and I’ve always appraoched the subject of success with the same attitude: ‘Try your best and then forget it’.

Why waste time worrying about things we can’t influence?

Education and schooling prepares children for life, it teaches them the improtance of discipline and routine. It’s only the fortunate few who are naturally gifted, most of us have to work damned hard for a living, so the sooner we learn the work ethic the better.

If you want to teach your children about life, get them a pet. Learning to care about something other than ourselves is a vital life skill.

I think the most important part of education is ‘vocabulary’. The ability to communicate effectively with people is one of if not THE most important life skills. Being able to express oneself is so important.

I believe a large percentage of violence stems from the inability to communicate ones true feelings effectively and the subsequent frustration that that brings. Wars have been fought in the past simply because of prejudice and a lack of tolerence and understanding of others.

The world is undoubtedly becoming a ‘smaller’ place and our understanding of each others cultures and traditions is improving. I just hope that we don’t become to reliant upon technology because I’m a firm believer in the concept of moderation in all things.

“The great thing, then, in all education, is to make our nervous system our ally instead of our enemy.” – William James (1842 – 1910)

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

 

Everyone loves a scandal, none of us like to admit it but who could honestly say they have never gossiped about anyone?

People have gossiped since the birth of mankind, there is obviously something very addictive about it, it’s ingrained in our psyche and although it is wrong and often unfair people we will never stop doing it.

“A rumor without a leg to stand on will get around some other way.” – John Tudor

Gossip is one way of letting off steam about the frustrations of our own lives. We all strive for bigger, better and more rewarding lives and when we struggle to meat our own expectations other peoples’ misfortunes become an antidote for our own shortcomings.

We all love to bring people down a peg or two especially if they are perceived to be doing better than us.

Jealousy is a catalyst of rumour and scandal. Revenge is never pleasant and it’s often as harmful for the perpitrator as it is for the recipient. Therefor, it is unwise to disrespsct people just because we don’t like them, or we believe they have done something to upset us.

Celebrities are an easy target of the rumour mill. We could argue that the extreme scrutiny they are subject to comes with the territory but they are still human beings with the same frailties as everyone else and they are entitled to their privacy.

“It is the gossip columnist’s business to write about what is none of his business.” – Louis Kronenberger

Don’t get me wrong, some celebrities make a living just from being a celebrity and if you make a living just from being in the news then you have to be prepared to accept the negative consequences.

But genuine ‘A’ list celebrities, people who are famous for what they actually do or what they contribute towards society should be given a certain amount of freedom so they can live their lives in a relatively normal way.

Unfortunately, bad news sells, hence the media exploit and exagerate it, it boosts their ratings, which is fine, they are doing their job, they are giving us what we want. However, what do the media do when there is no bad news to report and their ratings start to suffer?. Obviously, they go looking for more bad news or worse still they invent it.

Revelling in other people’s problems make us feel better about our own. It’s human nature to enjoy feeling superior and self-righteous, it makes us feel good, It satisfys some inner need.

Communication is the life blood of society so we could argue it would be foolish to try to supress it. Improved communication makes the world a smaller place and that for the main part is a good thing. The more we talk to one another the more tolerant we become of each others views.

Gossip is just the down side of communication, it’s like a raw material before it has been processed and purified to make the finished product. It’s always better to get our facts straight before we pass on any information and if we do have to gossip it’s more constructive to concentrate on the positive because the negative can be extremely dangerous.

People take insults to their graves, we are all a lot more sensitve than we like to admit, a loose comment can create a life-long enemy and the fewer of those we have the better.

Knowing that people will always gossip and talk about us as much as they talk to us we can use the ‘grapevine’ to our own advatage. For example we can praise people that are important to us as long as the praise is genuine of course, sure enough the praise will eventually find it’s way back to them. Furthermore, if we know someone is prone to gossiping we can use them to spread news fast.

Words are extremely powerful and if we can limit the amount of times we criticise and/or disagree with people to a minimum then we will undoubtedly improve our own lives.

we all live in glass houses and if we throw a rock at someone they have a tendency to throw one back.

“Fire and swords are slow engines of destruction, compared to the tongue of a Gossip.” – Richard Steele

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

Like it or not we are all obsessed with the weather. Granted, us Brits are more obsessed than most but our excuse is our climate is probably the most miserable. The weather does affect each and everyone of us though and it affects virtually everything we do.

information on the weather is available in every form of media but the most annoying ‘forecasts’ are the ones that proudly declare what the weather HAS actually been like! (We know that, tell us something we don’t know)

Invariably the forecasts are innacurate but that does not stop us from listening to them and even trusting in them time after time, it’s so frustrating. (Do old people talk about anything else but the weather? Okay, hospitals – fair point)

“Don’t knock the weather. If it didn’t change once in a while, nine out of ten people couldn’t start a conversation.” –  Kin Hubbard

“I cannot command winds and weather.” –  Horatio Nelson

# the weather affects our mood, we all feel better when the Sun is shining, it puts a stride in our step, a smile on our face. Some people, my wife included claim to suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D., not for them that’s what it stands for).

Basically sufferers become depressed throuugh a lack of sunshine (my wife’s excuse for booking more holidays! – Us men are not fools you know, I promise)

# Many peoples livelihoods are dependent upon the weather, fishermen, farmers, gardeners to name but a few. Snowfall can bring a nation (well the UK anyway) to a grinding halt. Seriously though, droughts have wreaked havoc across the World and caused large scale famines and untold deaths. The forces of nature are invincible.

The UK is the only country in the world that has an annual rainfall in excess of 35 inches but still has to suffer a hosepipe ban if it doesn’t rain for over a week. Last summer we couldn’t’ve watered our lawns if we’d wanted to, because for the most part they were submerged under two feet of water! but was the ban lifted, not on your life.

# We all wish for clement weather during our leisure time, we want it to be sunny when we are on holiday, when I was a child I used to holiday with a friend whose mother used to insist that ‘we looked like we were enjoying hot weather’ for the photographs (us Brits – scary people)

# outdoor sports and events are always better when the Sun is shining, I always love the start of the football season (mid August) there’s nothing like watching a game of footy in the sunshine.

# Our clothing choice is dependent on the weather. Will we be warm enough? cool enough? do we need to protect ourselves with Sun cream?

“There’s no such thing as bad weather only innapropriate clothing.” – Billy Connolly

# Most importantly the weather and forces of nature are all powerful. The recent events in Japan are all too commonplace in the World and we are virtually powerless to do anything about them.

We are at the mercy of the weather.

# Climate change is a big concern for all of us but I think we are exageraring our impact on the Earth, yes we should all respect the environment and do all we can to reduce our own personal and corporate carbon footprints.

However these actions are necessary for our own wellbeing and that of our children because the Earth was here a long time before we arrived and it will be here for a long time after we are gone.

“No matter how rich you become, how famous or powerful, when you die the size of your funeral will still pretty much depend on the weather.” Michael Pritchard

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

We buy things for many reasons, we buy lots of things we need and lots of things we don’t need. If you have serious designs on making money it is vital that you understand why people buy.

# Necessity:

We can’t live without things such as food, water, shelter etc, so we have to aquire them. However there is a subtle difference between actual necessities and perceived necessities.

Human beings can be extremely impulsive and exposure to products and services can make us think that we cannot live without them. Furthermore we are very susceptible to the power of peer pressure. ‘The kid next door has got a new bike so our kids have to have one.’

We actually feel guilty or bad if we don’t buy our kids everything their conmtemporaries have. Thus, we as a society leave ourselves wide open to exploitation by the advertising industry.

“An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit.” –  Pliny the Younger (62 AD – 114 AD)

# Emotions:

Our emotions play a great part in our shopping habits, lots of people comfort-shop, they buy things to give themselves a boost. Our mood is easily manipulated and our senses our susceptible to music, visual displays, enticing smells etc.

We buy for fun, we buy things that give us pleasure, we buy things that make us feel good, we buy to escape reality.

Mementos are also big sellers, there is nothing we like more than something that reminds us of a cherished memory – The power of nostalgia is immense.

We are all capable of greed, we all love a bargain, we all buy bulk items that we will never use.

# Real benefits:

We are fortunate to live at a time of great technological advancement, the labour-saving devices that have become available to us over the last 50 years have been astonishing.

Most of us like to improve ourselves, we will buy something if it will educate us or our children. Education is now available to a large proportion of us whereas less than a hundred years ago it was only available to a priviliged few. Furthermore the internet has made it possible for us to access information like never before.

We also buy things that we hope will make us money, we invest in all manner of things from jewellry to stocks and shares.

“To have little is to possess. To have plenty is to be perplexed.
Lao-tzu.” (604 BC – 531 BC)

# Image:

Everyone loves to look and feel good. image and prestige are both key buying motivators, if something makes us look good in the eyes of other people then we will buy it.

# Health: If we don’t have our health then we have nothing. People will pay to become healthier. Too often though we think we can get a ‘bargain’ a ‘quick fix’. Prevention is always better than the cure, moderation in all things

# Influences:

I started my career in retailing so I know a bit about sales psychology. I think the most important thing you can convey to someone in order to get them ito buy from you is TRUST.

We all like to buy from people we trust, someone that is going to make sure we get value for money, someone who is going to guide us through the minefields of their particular product or service. Trust is a key ingredient of repeat business.

Top advertisers and retailers are extremely adept at influencing our decision making when it comes to buying things, they create the right ambience for their products and services. They appeal to our ego’s, they make us think buying their goods will improve us in all manner of ways.

Personally, apart from life-saving products I think freedom and space are the most important commodities. If we can acheive these things then we owe it to ourselves to find the time to enjoy them.

“Before we set our hearts too much upon anything, let us examine how happy those are who already possess it.” F. Rochefoucauld (1613 – 1680)

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

How to Get Promoted

When pitching to a group of people it is crucial that we ascertain as early as possible who the decision maker(s) is. A good way of doing this is to ask the group a key question and look who they all turn to for the answer.

It’s very similar when we are looking to advance our careers. Find out who the key people are in your organisation and start getting to know how they tick. Find out as much as possible about them and what you have in common with them. Nurture this common ground.

‘My own business always bores me to death; I prefer other people’s.’
Oscar Wilde.’ – (1854 – 1900)

# Empathy:

Don’t kid yourself that your boss will promote you just because they think you are a wonderful person or even because you’re good at your job.

They’ll promote you because they think you can help them realise their OWN ambitions, they want someone who will act as an extension of themselves. Thus, if you want to get promoted you must learn to live and think like your boss.

# Responsibility:

Ask for more responsibility, be honest, don’t bite off more than you can chew, but do everything well. Produce quality work that has impact, not mass output that anyone can do. Keep asking for more and more responsibility and if you keep doing a good job then eventually you will become indespensible.

*If your boss refuses to give you additional responsibilities ask why and what you have to do in order to be considered for more important tasks.

# Image:

Act as if you’ve already been promoted, not in a conceited way but simply assume the position you are aiming for. Dress smarter, walk faster, this conveys importance, stand up straight. Convince yourself and those around you that you are capable of greater things.

‘I find it rather easy to portray a businessman. Being bland, rather cruel and incompetent comes naturally to me.’ – John Cleese (1939 – )

# Knowledge:

Be in the know, not just about your own business but about business in general, I read the financial pages on teletext every day, it takes less than 5 minutes.

# Confidence:

Don’t be afraid to be a bit cheeky but know where to draw the line. Ask for a better car/package/salary. If they turn you down on one thing ask for another. It’s hard for people to keep saying no.

# Determination:

Don’t give up, you’ll keep improving and learning, eventually you’ll get to where you want to be and if you don’t then at least you can rest easy in the knowledge that you gave it everything you had.

# Patience:

All good things take time, rather than hopping from one career to the next, find out what you’re good at and keep doing it.

‘In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.’ – Warren Buffett (1930 – )

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com

“Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.” –  Adelle Davis (1904 – 1974)

Even though we all need food to survive our relationship with food goes much deeper than that, we have developed this amazing love affair with it. All animals need to eat but we have turned eating and drinking into an art form.

# The senses: Eating and drinking is one of the few things that involves using all of our senses, we can see, hear, smell, touch and taste it. A good meal is indeed a truly absorbing experience.

# Provision: Our ancestors prided themselves in hunting down their food. Feasting on the catch was considered a great celebration, a time to be happy and grateful.

# Preparation: Many people love the act of preparing food, and making a delicious meal can be extremely rewarding.

# Dining/eating out: This is a very sociable thing to do, wether it’s in a posh restaurant or at a roadside cafe. Sharing food and conversation is a very important part of our society.

‘If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.’ – J R R Tolkien (1892 – 1973)

# Diet: Obviously a balanced diet is vital for us to lead a happy life. Modern-day life has made the availability of food plentiful for many of us. The down side to this is that we tend to over eat and under exercise.

However, too much is made of dieting, the more we think about something the more we want to do it.

Food is part of our lifestyle, and as such if we want to lose weight we need to change that lifestyle. Starving the body is no good for anyone.

Small portins eaten often is the key to a healthy diet.

Modern-day lifestyles do not lend themselves to ‘not eating between meals’. Once we accept this we will also accept that we can and will eat many times a day. Thus the smaller the portions the better.

The three square meals philosophy believed in by our parents and grand parents no longer holds true.

Let’s hope we can maintain our centuries-old love affair with food because at the end of the day we should eat to live not live to eat.

‘Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.’ – Mark Twain (1835 – 1910)

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggegts4u.com

Time is precious, we all know that. We all get the same amount of time each day, time is perhaps one of the few even playing fields in life. Thus how we utilise it is vital to our success and happiness.

We must use time as a tool, not as a crutch. – John F. Kennedy (1917 – 1963)

Dashing around like a headless chickens acheives nothing, thus planning is vital in everything. If we take a relatively small amount of time to plan it will pay us great dividends later on.

I always start a task by brainstorming, just jotting down everything I (We) know about a subject, it doesnt matter how crazy the ideas are, it’s just important to get it all out.

Next add to your own ideas with a bit of research and then arrange your information into some kind of logical order.

Time is so important and non renewable that we must try to make the most of every second of it. For example even when we are doing mundain things such as queueing we can still occupy our minds in a useful way such as reciting affirmations or ‘compiling’ articles.

Rather than dashing everywhere it is more productive to build TEMPO. The earlier in the day that we can manage this the more prooductive our day will be. It is also important to pace ourselves and to take breaks for food and rest. Burnout sucks, believe me.

There is never enough time, unless you’re serving it. – Malcolm Forbes (1919 – 1990)

Once we have planned our day or task, we must then prioritise, contrary to most other PD specialists I believe in working through easy to tough, except of course when something is time critical.

The easy jobs help build tempo and as the difficulty of the tasks increases we have also gained in fluidity. Furthermore if we spend hours on our most difficult task we then find ourselves short on time to do everything else.

It’s better to have one unfinished piece of work than twenty.

I think that routine gets a bad press, routines can be very beneficial to us and are an integral part of success, we should always try to become quicker and more skilled at all our daily tasks and eventually we will be able to do more and more in the same amount of time and with the same amount of effort.

If something saves me 20 seconds then I’ll do it.

Leisure time is vital, not only do we all need time to re charge our batteries but rest and play gives the subconscious mind time to mull over all our goals and problems.

It is possible to ‘stretch’ time by being more aware about what we are doing not just going through the motions of life.

Time is infinite, it will still be around long after we are gone. If we all achieve emotional happiness our time here will have been well spent.

Time is the most valuable thing a man can spend. – Theophrastus (372 BC – 287 BC)

Andy.

http://www.wealthnuggets4u.com